Agatha Christie – The Murder at the Vicarage – First Paperback Edition 1948

agatha christie the murder at the vicarage paperback first1

Agatha Christie – The Murder at the Vicarage – First Paperback Edition 1948

£185.00

In stock

£185.00

First paperback edition, first printing. Published by Penguin in London, 1948. This is a very good copy. The soft cover is mostly clean throughout, despite some mild surface scratching present and surface spotting. Both hinges are intact and tight, though appear in places irregular. The text blocks are free from foxing, but browned. The internals are free from previous owners ink and mostly toned, due to the poor paperstock. Overall, this is a very good copy.
It is the first novel to feature the character of Miss Marple and her village of St Mary Mead. This first look at St Mary Mead led a reviewer in 1990 to ask why these are called cosy mysteries: “Our first glimpse of St Mary Mead, a hotbed of burglary, impersonation, adultery and ultimately murder. What is it precisely that people find so cosy about such stories?”


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Description

First paperback edition, first printing. Published by Penguin in London, 1948. This is a very good copy. The soft cover is mostly clean throughout, despite some mild surface scratching present and surface spotting. Both hinges are intact and tight, though appear in places irregular. The text blocks are free from foxing, but browned. The internals are free from previous owners ink and mostly toned, due to the poor paperstock. Overall, this is a very good copy.
It is the first novel to feature the character of Miss Marple and her village of St Mary Mead. This first look at St Mary Mead led a reviewer in 1990 to ask why these are called cosy mysteries: “Our first glimpse of St Mary Mead, a hotbed of burglary, impersonation, adultery and ultimately murder. What is it precisely that people find so cosy about such stories?”